Thursday, October 24, 2013

Welcoming Author Marilyn Meredith

Today I'm happy to host my good friend Marilyn Meredith here at Cicero's Children. Marilyn Meredith is the author of over thirty published novels, including the award winning Deputy Tempe Crabtree mystery series. She borrows a lot from where she lives in the Southern Sierra for the town of Bear Creek and the surrounding area, including the nearby Tule River Indian Reservation. She does like to remind everyone that she is writing fiction. Marilyn is a member of EPIC, three chapters of Sisters in Crime, Mystery Writers of America, and on the board of the Public Safety Writers of America. Visit her at http://fictionforyou.com and follow her blog at http://marilynmeredith.blogspot.com/


Halloween Memories

When I was kid, trick-or-treating was an adventure. We traipsed all over the neighborhood with no adults supervising. We older kids, and I’m talking nine or ten, had our younger siblings in tow. At least we had them until they got too tired and then we took them back home, and headed out again.

Those were the war years (WWII) and sugar was rationed, so the most wonderful treats were the homemade ones like popcorn balls, chocolate chip cookies, and candied apples. We had no reason to fear razor blades or poison. And we weren’t ashamed to hit up a house with homemade goodies a second time. We also passed the word where the “good stuff” was to others on the street.

One time I ventured out on my own. I can’t remember why, but probably my friends had tired and given up. I know I was on a street several blocks from home and had to climb a whole flight of stairs to a house I’d never been to before. I knocked and shouted, “Trick or Treat.”

A man with a fierce expression opened the door with a rifle pointed right at me. He growled, “You know what I do to kids who come trick or treating?”

Positive I was about to die, I managed to squeak out, “No, sir.”
He grinned, lowered the rifle and said, “I give them candy,” and he did.

I hightailed it home after that—and though I don’t know for sure, I have a strong feeling I never went trick-or-treating on my own after that.


What about you? What kind of Halloween Memories do you have?

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About Spirit Shapes, Marilyn's latest book: Ghost hunters stumble upon a murdered teen in a haunted house. Deputy Tempe Crabtree's investigation pulls her into a whirlwind of restless spirits, good and evil, intertwined with the past and the present, and demons and angels at war.

Contest:

The person who comments on the most blogs on Marilyn's blog tour will have the opportunity to have a character named after him or her in the next Deputy Tempe Crabtree mystery.

Tomorrow Marilyn will be visiting here: http://cncbooksblog.wordpress.com/

To buy directly from Marilyn's publisher in all formats: http://mundania.com/book.php?title=Spirit+Shapes
Her books are also available directly from Amazon.

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18 comments:

  1. Hi. It's me again ;) I am persistent. And Hi Mary! I never got to Trick or Treat :( Without fail I had the mumps or the measles or something every Halloween. I did get to sit home in some great costumes though as the people across the street were entertainers and they had so many great costumes. And I wasn't crazy about candy anyway.

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    1. Kate, I'd be disappointed if you weren't the first person to comment on one of the blogs I've been visiting. Way back when I was trick-or-treating, candy was a big treat--so much was rationed and hard to get at that time.

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  2. Marilyn, love your post, and love that photo of you and Hap! I lived out in the Oklahoma boonies as a kid and the only Halloween prank was dumping over outhouses by older boys. Later, living in town, Halloween seemed strictly for the boys, who did silly things like tying a cow on the high school stage. If memory serves, regular trick or treating in Oklahoma started after World War II when the UNICEF program began. But whenever and whatever, thanks for the memories.

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    1. Hap tells tales like yours about Halloween. The photo was taken on my birthday (the big one) and we were at my daughter's celebrating. And Pat, what are you doing up so early?

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  3. Hi Marilyn - My trick-or-treating experiences were similar to yours. I grew up in a New York City suburb in the fifties and sixties, and we tended to go out in groups, starting almost as soon as we got home from school until our feet completely gave out. Because the suburb where we lived was densely populated, we could get quite a haul of candy in the few hours we were out.

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    1. Karen, I grew up in Los Angeles, and my trick-or-treating days were during the '40s. That's interesting that our experiences were so similar though my mom wouldn't let us begin until it was dark.

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  4. First, thank you so much, Mary, for hosting me today. I love visiting your blog. For those who don't know, Mary is a nurse and she's answered questions for me pertaining to my books and I appreciate her. She is also one of the blog hosts who I know personally having met her at Mayhem in the Midlands, I believe, and running into her at other conferences including Love is Murder where she took hubby and me home for a great afternoon visit.

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    1. Hosting you was my pleasure entirely, Marilyn. I love your books, and of course I adore both you and Hap. (Tell Hap that Fred says hello!)

      My most memorable Halloween was the year my mom saw a pattern in one of the ladies' magazines for costumes made from Halloween paper tablecloths. That was back in the '50's, and seemed like a great idea to my mom. So she made witches costumes from paper tablecloths for my sister and me. The only problem was, they started ripping as soon as we started running from house to house. And then it started to rain! Of course we wouldn't stop for a little rain, but boy! Did we look bedraggled by the time we got home! :)

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  5. Marilyn,
    I went trick-or-treating in the late fifties. We didn't have to worry about poisoned candy or razor blades either.
    One year, I dressed as a fairy princess. I loved the pale blue chiffon costume and it was so much fun to carry a magic wand! In those days, it was customary to wear a mask no matter what your costume was but, without realizing it, I had left home without mine.
    I knocked on the first door and a woman answered. "Honey, where's your mask?"
    I just shook my head. I couldn't believe I'd forgotten mine.
    She laughed. "Oh well, no matter. "You're too pretty to wear a mask anyway." I could feel my face turning red.
    I refused to go to any other houses until I returned home to get my mask! Funny, the things that embarrass us as kids. I wouldn't be the least bit offended if someone said that to me now. :)

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    1. I loved your story, Patricia. I can't even remember any costume that I wore. I do remember several that I made for my kids though. Favorite was a book worm.

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  6. I remember from about seven years old to about ten insisting I wear nothing under my store bought--flammable I think in those days--flimsy Casper the Ghost or Robin Hood costumes other than my underwear and waking up the next day with a good case of bronchitis that lasted well into November. Those were the days. NOT! Great to see you here, Marilyn.

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    1. Thanks for sharing, Paul. I'm sure your mom tried to convince you otherwise. Kids get odd notions.

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  7. My youngest daughter stopped by last night to ask a favor of me. Of course I said "Sure!", so she dragged out a plastic bag full of material and said, "Could you sew these for me tonight?" Yep, Halloween costumes she'd created for her and her boyfriend. They're going to a party this weekend as Fred and Wilma Flintstone. Three hours later, I gladly said goodbye to Mary Caroline and her two completed costumes. :)

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    1. Years ago, I might've done the same--but I gave my sewing machine away. Good for you, Mary.

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  8. Sugar wasn't rationed during my trick or treating days, but life was definitely safer for us than it is for my children. Many parents around here now bring their kids to the Boo at the Zoo, Trunk or Treat, Park A Boo, and pumpkin patches, all organized trick or trick activities with lots of adult supervision and paid cop details, to avoid knocking all night on strange doors for strange candy. My sister does the door to door, but she brings her two mean, yippy chihuahuas for protection. Most people give them lots of candy just so they'll leave.

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    1. Hi, Holli, isn't it a shame times have changed so much? But it's also great that community clubs and churches and others have stepped up to have a safe trick-or-treating for kids.

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  9. What great memories! Nothing I could say would come anywhere near the guy with the rifle. Oh, my!
    Marja McGraw

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    1. Looking back, I know I did NOT tell my mother about that trick-or-treat memory, Marja.

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